Freezing fish and cholesterol damage

About (not) consuming fresh raw fish and fresh raw egg yolks
djkvan
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Freezing fish and cholesterol damage

Postby djkvan » Tue 14 Sep 2010 00:49

From the acne book:
Foods containing the most oxy-cholesterols are foods that by nature contain most cholesterol and have been heated (and/or frozen) a number of times
To prevent the intake of oxy-cholesterols, you must stop eating cooked and/or frozen animal food.

Does this mean that I can't freeze my sashimi? I thought that freezing was okay. I eat very little at once and cannot logically purchase such a small quantity, so that freezing for later use becomes the only logical course of action.
I do so like green eggs and ham. Thank you, thank you. Sam I am.
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Oscar
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Re: Freezing fish and cholesterol damage

Postby Oscar » Tue 14 Sep 2010 10:54

There is actually a sticky in this forum about frozen fish, which explains that it's okay.
djkvan
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Re: Freezing fish and cholesterol damage

Postby djkvan » Tue 14 Sep 2010 20:57

Thanks, Oscar.
So the protein issue is addressed in the sticky, but I am wondering about the cholesterol. Although there are minimal amounts in fish, does it remain intact? Is this information available?
I do so like green eggs and ham. Thank you, thank you. Sam I am.
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Oscar
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Re: Freezing fish and cholesterol damage

Postby Oscar » Wed 15 Sep 2010 11:34

I'm not sure, but I would think so. As the prefix suggests, it's oxidated cholesterol, so heat treated cholesterol. These unnatural oxysterols (yep there are also natural ones) are the result. Afaik colder temperatures ic freezing doesn't have an influence.
djkvan
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Joined: Thu 24 Jun 2010 17:13
Location: Vancouver, B.C. Canada

Re: Freezing fish and cholesterol damage

Postby djkvan » Wed 15 Sep 2010 20:18

Oscar wrote:As the prefix suggests, it's oxidated cholesterol, so heat treated cholesterol
Thanks. Being reminded of this is helpful. Although slow oxidation can occur in the absence of cooking, I cannot find any reference to oxidation which might occur at freezing temperatures. I did however find a site discussing the effects of freezing on food (http://www.rawfoodexplained.com/selecti ... foods.html) which is making me consider buying a dehydrator for my salmon instead of freezing it. I'm not sure if it is such a big deal in the long run as I consume my salmon immediately upon thawing and reaching room temperature. Any thoughts?
I do so like green eggs and ham. Thank you, thank you. Sam I am.
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Oscar
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Re: Freezing fish and cholesterol damage

Postby Oscar » Thu 16 Sep 2010 11:31

Well, the 'problem' with Raw Food sites is that they claim to be scientific, yet they never seem to have any scientific sources. While I don't want to automatically presume their lysosome theory is wrong, it does seem a bit unlikely to me. I can accept the lysosome mechanism, but that leading to harmful substances (changing the chemical structure in such a way it becomes damaging to our bodies after digestion) again seems improbable. Oxidation always happens when food comes in contact with the air, as it's part of the decomposing process, so leaving food exposed will diminish the nutrient content. If one's nutrient deprived, this might be a problem.
Of course the bacteria issue isn't an issue.

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