Sucrose and Dentin formation

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avalon
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Sucrose and Dentin formation

Post by avalon »

Yesterday while searching google 'diet experiments' as you never know what you may find, I came across a study on Sucrose and dentin formation. Since you, Oscar said you were doing a paper on sugar I thought you might want to read this. You may also find this interesting, RRM with your ostioporosis theories.

Quotes:
Our previous studies on the effect of a high sucrose diet demonstrated that the diet itself reduces dentin formation (Bäckman and Larmas 1997, Huumonen et al. 1997, Larmas and Tjäderhane 1992, Tjäderhane et al. 1994 and 1995a) and the degree of dentin mineralization (Tjäderhane 1996) during the primary dentinogenesis in rats. Because the dentin and bone formations have considerable similarities (Linde and Goldberg 1993), osteoblasts may also be affected by the high sucrose diet. Primary bone formation during adolescence is believed to determine its resistance against osteoporotic changes in the elderly (Dempster and Lindsay 1993, Heaney 1993, Lindsay 1993). Therefore, the effects of dietary alterations during juvenile osteogenesis merit detailed analysis.
The lower density and mechanical strength found in both the tibias and the femurs of the sucrose-fed groups demonstrates that the sucrose diet alters the mechanical properties of the bone.
The adverse effect of sucrose on mineralizing tissue is also demonstrated as a reduction in dentin formation
Therefore, these results reveal the deteriorating effect of the refined carbohydrate diet on mineral composition and mechanical strength in rapidly growing bones. One of the most important preventive factors in osteoporosis is the peak bone mass achieved during the preteen years (Dempster and Lindsay 1993, Heaney 1993, Lindsay 1993), and the long-term experiment with a high fat/sucrose diet demonstrates that the adverse effects on bone are not recoverable (Zernicke et al. 1995), at least not without dietary change.
I know we're talking about rats here, but still, this my diet dilemma- doesn't the high juicing and table sugar play right into this?

http://jdr.iadrjournals.org/cgi/reprint/81/8/536.pdf
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RRM
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Post by RRM »

Have you ever read the osteoporosis article, avalon?

Higher osteoblast activity and mineralisation indeed comes with higher bone mineral density and... higher fracture rates in the elderly.
Sucrose does not contain calcium, which might explain the correlation.
avalon
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Post by avalon »

You've lost me. I'm sure I've missed something. I was only directing you to the article. I understand your belief to be higher intakes of calcium has a reverse effect. Is this so?

What about the reduction in dentin- was the article saying this is good? If so, I did misunderstand completely.
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Post by RRM »

osteoblasts may also be affected by the high sucrose diet. Primary bone formation during adolescence is believed to determine its resistance against osteoporotic changes in the elderly
It has been shown by international studies that in countries with the highest bone formation during adolescence (countries with the highest average peak bone mass), osteoporosis is most prevalent (age adjusted).
avalon
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Post by avalon »

So are you saying that the people with the best bone density have less teeth? Because again, I am more concerned about dentin.

Okay, stop, when should we peak- bone density wise? If not in adolescence, when? Should we peak at all?
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Post by RRM »

avalon wrote:So are you saying that the people with the best bone density have less teeth?
:?
Not at all.
Okay, stop, when should we peak- bone density wise? If not in adolescence, when? Should we peak at all?
Everybody peaks in adolescence. Thats perfectly ok.
In countries where this peak is greatest (on average), osteoporosis is most prevalent. Obviously, there is something about peaking too high. (what goes up, must go....)
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