Dental plaque causes demineralization

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sunpower9
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Dental plaque causes demineralization

Post by sunpower9 »

now i read that lactic acid causes dental caries :shock: so even if its so tempting to eat it...one must learn to stay away from it as well ! Frankly i just loved this munch food and had it a couple more times....but the caries news prevents me from eatin it frequently...great munch food though,thanx..http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dental_caries only if it wasnt caries causin :(
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RRM
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Re: vanilla ice cream

Post by RRM »

All food is caries causing, as eating is.
The more often you eat or drink (as on the Wai diet), the more your teeth are exposed to enamel-eroding acids.
My teeth look great though, because i regularly go to a dentist.
sunpower9
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Re: vanilla ice cream

Post by sunpower9 »

hahahaha...good to hear that not all r dentists phobiac.... :) ya foods we eat do cause erosion regardless of any kinda diets...i agree...
panacea
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Re: vanilla ice cream

Post by panacea »

My dentist said that even if you didn't eat at all (fed by IV 24/7), and didn't brush your teeth or wash them somehow, they will still erode (even faster than when eating) because of the plaque that forms over them even absent of food?

I've always been puzzled by if this is true or not
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Oscar
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Re: vanilla ice cream

Post by Oscar »

Well if there's no acid, there's no erosion. Seems unlikely to me.
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RRM
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Re: vanilla ice cream

Post by RRM »

Yes, I think the plaque releases acids, which causes demineralization.
panacea
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Re: vanilla ice cream

Post by panacea »

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dental_plaque
Bingo RRM!

"Acids released from dental plaque lead to demineralization of the adjacent tooth surface, and consequently to dental caries. Saliva is also unable to penetrate the build-up of plaque and thus cannot act to neutralize the acid produced by the bacteria and remineralize the tooth surface."
overkees
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Re: vanilla ice cream

Post by overkees »

But does it release these acids in a reaction with saliva? Or other substances only? Thats the question..
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Oscar
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Re: vanilla ice cream

Post by Oscar »

Plaque is a mixture of bacteria, saliva, and food. Bacteria need food to produce (lactic) acid. No food, no acid. No acid, no demineralization.
panacea
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Re: Dental plaque causes demineralization

Post by panacea »

"Dental plaque is a biofilm, usually a pale yellow, that develops naturally on the teeth. Like any biofilm, dental plaque is formed by colonizing bacteria trying to attach themselves to a smooth surface (of a tooth)[1]."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dental_plaque

According to this, there is no mention about the 'food/saliva' requirement of plaque. It just says bacteria. And it's known that some bacteria produce acid. So where is the proof that plaque cannot form in the absensce of food, even if normally, when people are not fasting, plaque does contain bits of food?

Basically where is the evidence that it can't exist both ways?
dime
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Re: Dental plaque causes demineralization

Post by dime »

As Oscar said bacteria need to eat, and the waste from their metabolism is acid. They can't produce acid out of nothing.

http://www.personal.psu.edu/faculty/j/e ... rimer.html
How do biofilms form?

Place a clean sterile glass slide in a stream of water containing at least minimal nutrients, and over the course of days or weeks a microbial ecosystem will form consisting of a variety of microorganisms arranged in a complex relationship to one another and embedded in a mass of extracellular polysaccharides of their own making.
The ability of oral bacteria to store iodophilic polysaccharides or glycogen-like molecules inside their cells is associated with dental caries since these storage compounds may extend the time during which lactic acid formation may occur. It is this prolonged exposure to lactic acid which results in decalcification of tooth enamel.
panacea
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Re: Dental plaque causes demineralization

Post by panacea »

still doesn't make sense - our skin is crawling with bacteria, which also produce acids, and I'm not covering my skin with butter or honey, so why can't this happen in the mouth without external food?
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RRM
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Re: Dental plaque causes demineralization

Post by RRM »

The skin rapidly sheds cells, and maybe bacteria on our skin feed on dead skin cells?
dime
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Re: Dental plaque causes demineralization

Post by dime »

Good point, plus the skin is exposed to air, not so moist as the mouth; these biofilms seem to need very watery environment in order to start forming.
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