Raw milk cheese

The reasons why it's excluded from this diet
halfgaar
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Raw milk cheese

Postby halfgaar » Sun 24 Aug 2008 16:33

I was wondering about cheese made from raw milk. See this page for info how they make it (dutch page).

I know I'm not supposed to drink milk, but aside from that, would it cause acne? I'm experimenting with it now, but I'd like your input.

The page describes in detail how it is made, and heating is especially avoided. It is warmed up to 29 degrees C max. It does contain salt, however. How much salt would be needed to cause acne?

Once again, I'm know I'm not supposed to eat or drink dairy, but I don't really care about that. Our ancestors didn't go through all that trouble to make our body tolerate it :)
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RRM
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Re: Raw milk cheese

Postby RRM » Wed 27 Aug 2008 19:52

halfgaar wrote:I know I'm not supposed to drink milk, but aside from that, would it cause acne?
yes, due to the specific hard to digest proteins it naturally (raw) contains and the permeability-increasing effect on your intestines (for suckling thats a good thing; increasing uptake of nutrients)
How much salt would be needed to cause acne?
a grain of salt can already cause acne if you normally dont consume salt (and are susceptible to acne)
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Postby halfgaar » Wed 27 Aug 2008 22:46

yes, due to the specific hard to digest proteins it naturally (raw) contains and the permeability-increasing effect on your intestines (for suckling thats a good thing; increasing uptake of nutrients)
Hard to digest proteins? I would think a suckling needs just the opposite.
a grain of salt can already cause acne if you normally dont consume salt (and are susceptible to acne)
A find it rather strange that it is that severe. The father of a friend of mine has lived in Saudi Arabia for quite some time, and they used to poor a pot of salt through the barrels of drinking water they brought along, otherwise they would die from lack of salt. This is a biological necessity. It strikes me as rather odd that this could cause acne.
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Oscar
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Postby Oscar » Thu 28 Aug 2008 11:10

halfgaar wrote:
yes, due to the specific hard to digest proteins it naturally (raw) contains and the permeability-increasing effect on your intestines (for suckling thats a good thing; increasing uptake of nutrients)
Hard to digest proteins? I would think a suckling needs just the opposite.
Hard to digest for a different species than the milk was meant for.
halfgaar
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Postby halfgaar » Thu 28 Aug 2008 12:21

Ah, I see.

Anyway, I'll keep it in mind, and I'll keep you updated on the progress. I can't test very well at this moment, because I'm still waiting for the effects of two consecutive days of eating cooked food to go away...
halfgaar
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Postby halfgaar » Fri 26 Sep 2008 12:33

It's been some time now that I've been trying this, and it would appear that it has a slight effect, although I can't say for sure. One week, when I eat 1 kg cheese in two days, the effects are not noticeable, and another week, I get a small spot. Never anything major, anyway.

And, it may be that I've accidentally bought one normal piece of cheese, instead of raw (long story).

I'll be continuing the experiment for now, because the effects appear to be minor, and cheese tastes good :)
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Postby RRM » Wed 15 Oct 2008 14:08

For you maybe, but other people may be more susceptible to acne. (like me)
halfgaar
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Postby halfgaar » Wed 15 Oct 2008 14:29

True. I do notice it has some effects. If I truly want to remain acne free, I stay away from the cheese.
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Re: Raw milk cheese

Postby Oscar » Mon 20 Oct 2008 10:48

halfgaar wrote:Our ancestors didn't go through all that trouble to make our body tolerate it :)
Btw, you know this was a mutation and that in fact we should all be lactose intolerant (like plenty of people in the East still are)?
halfgaar
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Postby halfgaar » Mon 20 Oct 2008 11:22

Btw, you know this was a mutation and that in fact we should all be lactose intolerant (like plenty of people in the East still are)?
Yes, I do. The fact that you can see is also a mutation; that's how you came to be... :)
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Postby Oscar » Tue 21 Oct 2008 11:12

But in that case our ancestors didn't go through any trouble at all. ;)
halfgaar
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Postby halfgaar » Tue 21 Oct 2008 11:23

Well, because they kept drinking milk, their bodies adapted to it.

BTW, I've been told that hard cheese doesn't even contain lactose...
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Postby johndela1 » Wed 22 Oct 2008 21:29

just because your can drink milk doesn't mean you should

(unless you need it to survive)
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Postby halfgaar » Wed 22 Oct 2008 21:34

True. But it's not that I'm advertising to drink milk or eat cheese. I'm just saying that for me, raw milk cheese doesn't seem to have much influence, and it can add some variety to the diet.
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Postby johndela1 » Thu 23 Oct 2008 20:03

halfgaar wrote:Well, because they kept drinking milk, their bodies adapted to it.

BTW, I've been told that hard cheese doesn't even contain lactose...
do you think people adapt to milk or over the generations the mutation that allows one to digest lactose was helpful for surviving and over time the group of people acquired this trait

quote from wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lactose_intolerance

"Lactase biology

The normal mammalian condition is for the young of a species to experience reduced lactase production at the end of the weaning period (a species-specific length of time). In non dairy consuming societies, lactase production usually drops about 90% during the first four years of life, although the exact drop over time varies widely.[8]. The majority of the world's human population follows this trend, with the lactase producing genes largely inactivated in adulthood.[9][1]

However, certain human populations have a mutation on chromosome 2 which eliminates the shutdown in lactase production, making it possible for members of these populations to continue consumption of fresh milk and other dairy products throughout their lives without difficulty. This appears to be an evolutionarily recent adaptation to dairy consumption, and has occurred independently in both northern Europe and east Africa in populations with a historically pastoral lifestyle.[9] Lactase persistence, allowing lactose digestion to continue into adulthood, is a dominant allele, making lactose intolerance a recessive genetic trait.

Some cultures, such as that of Japan, where dairy consumption has been on the increase, demonstrate a lower prevalence of lactose intolerance in spite of a genetic predisposition[10].

Pathological lactose intolerance can be caused by Coeliac disease, which damages the villi in the small intestine that produce lactase. This lactose intolerance is temporary. Lactose intolerance associated with coeliac disease ceases after the patient has been on a gluten-free diet long enough for the villi to recover[citation needed].

Certain people who report problems with consuming lactose are not actually lactose intolerant. In a study of 323 Sicilian adults, Carroccio et al. (1998) found only 4% were both lactose intolerant and lactose maldigesters, while 32.2% were lactose maldigesters but did not test as lactose intolerant. However, Burgio et al. (1984) found that 72% of 100 Sicilians were lactose intolerant in their study and 106 of 208 northern Italians (i.e., 51%) were lactose intolerant."

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