Blood protein levels and focus/concentration

State of mind, mental focus, ADHD, sleep, motivation, studying etc
djkvan
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Blood protein levels and focus/concentration

Postby djkvan » Sun 12 Sep 2010 20:30

From a scientific perspective, how/why would excessive levels of protein in the circulatory system/lymphatic system affect concentration/focus/mood? Is it due to depleted vitamin/mineral levels? Could you give me an in-depth breakdown of the process? Also, I am guessing that since the body prefers sugar as a fuel over fats, and fats over proteins, that elevated blood-protein levels would remain elevated throughout the day, and would only fall overnight or between 6-8am when redundant protein returns to the liver. Wouldn't this excess blood protein at some level affect ones ability to read their energy needs during the day leading to concentration issues, and/or hyperness/sluggishness due to over/under-consumption of calories, or is the excess protein generally stored in the lymph/elsewhere during daytime?
I do so like green eggs and ham. Thank you, thank you. Sam I am.
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RRM
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Re: Blood protein levels and focus/concentration

Postby RRM » Sat 18 Sep 2010 18:38

djkvan wrote:From a scientific perspective, how/why would excessive levels of protein in the circulatory system/lymphatic system affect concentration/focus/mood?
Check this out:
http://www.waiworld.com/waisays/diseases/dis-depression.html wrote:- To transform tryptophan into serotonine, vitamin B6 is required. Consuming more protein than you need, requires extra vitamin B6 (and B2 and folic acid). Consuming too much proteinous food inhibits serotonine production.

- Consuming too much increases blood-amino acid levels, making it harder for the brain to specifically pick up tryptophan. The amino acid phenylalanine inhibits serotonine production, through inhibiting decarboxylation of 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophane into serotonine.

- Consuming too much protein increases blood-phenylalanine level. The amino acid phenylalanine inhibits serotonine production, through inhibiting decarboxylation of 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophane into serotonine.

- Consuming too much protein increases blood-leucine level. The amino acid leucine enhances tryptophan-pyrrolase, irreversibly decomposing tryptophan. Unfortunately, the liver cannot decompose leucine, tissues like muscles can.
Wouldn't this excess blood protein at some level affect ones ability to read their energy needs
To some degree, yes.
or is the excess protein generally stored in the lymph/elsewhere during daytime?
Only hard to degrade protein.
All other protein is decomposed into free amino acid levels, which can rise from 100% up to 900%!
djkvan
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Re: Blood protein levels and focus/concentration

Postby djkvan » Sat 18 Sep 2010 22:43

"The Diet" recommends:
- Eat some sashimi or other fresh raw animal food regularly, but no more than 50-60 grams (1½ – 2 ounces) daily. Even a large adult man just needs about 50 g of fresh raw salmon daily to maintain muscle volume, besides the protein from the fruits, of course. You can have 50 grams fresh raw salmon, tuna or mackerel on one day, and 2 to 4 fresh raw egg yolks on the next day, for example.
- Consuming more protein than you need requires more vitamin B2, B6, and folic acid to process this extra protein.

What is your position on this recommendation of limited protein, RRM? You seem to recommend that people consume as many eggs as they can (to avoid nutrient shortages), and if I recall correctly, you consume about 133g of salmon per day (assuming your diet has remained constant since I last read this info). I realize that you are very active and speed-walking all day, but there is a disconnect between your recommendations and those of the book. I know the acne book was published years ago and hasn't been recently updated. Perhaps this has something to do with the shift. Nevertheless, excess protein is truly a concern for learning, focus and moods, etc.,. There is a learning curve to this diet I realize, but any glimpse into your learning process would be appreciated. Also you appear to consume very little fat. How can this work?
I do so like green eggs and ham. Thank you, thank you. Sam I am.
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RRM
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Re: Blood protein levels and focus/concentration

Postby RRM » Sun 19 Sep 2010 19:28

"The Diet"?
There is more than one version (acne sample diet, diet with munch foods, 100% no munch foods)
The "free acne book" includes Brazil nuts daily, if i recall correctly.
Without those, you need more salmon. (Brazil nuts contain very high quality protein)
djkvan wrote: What is your position on this recommendation of limited protein, RRM?
It depends on how active you are, what kind of activity etc.
there is a disconnect between your recommendations and those of the book.
There always is.
excess protein is truly a concern for learning, focus and moods, etc
For me, 133 grams of protein is not excess.
you appear to consume very little fat. How can this work?
Im very active physically, which requires a lot of sugar, and little fat.
Also, my muscle mass is not that great, so that i need little fatty acids for resting muscles.
djkvan
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Re: Blood protein levels and focus/concentration

Postby djkvan » Sun 19 Sep 2010 20:20

RRM wrote:The "free acne book" includes Brazil nuts daily, if i recall correctly.
Without those, you need more salmon. (Brazil nuts contain very high quality protein)
True. I missed that bit of logic. Thanks. I do like brazils but they take too long to digest as they are so concentrated so I don't take them often. I am guessing that you are tall, but small framed. I have a small skeletal framework. Could you tell me your height and weight for reference sake?

Also, how long does it take an avocado to leave the stomach. I'm guessing about an hour and a half. You have said that it is not a good idea to eat avocados after a protein meal, but what about, say, an hour or so before my protein meal. This is what I have been doing for the last few days.
I do so like green eggs and ham. Thank you, thank you. Sam I am.
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Oscar
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Re: Blood protein levels and focus/concentration

Postby Oscar » Mon 20 Sep 2010 11:47

In my experience 1.5-2 hrs should do it (with 1 avocado). 1 hr is a bit too short, unless it's a small avocado.
djkvan
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Re: Blood protein levels and focus/concentration

Postby djkvan » Mon 20 Sep 2010 22:03

Thanks. :)
I do so like green eggs and ham. Thank you, thank you. Sam I am.

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