Raw Butter

The reasons why it's excluded from this diet
Fairy Prince
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Raw Butter

Postby Fairy Prince » Mon 11 Dec 2006 07:08

Hi Everyone. I'm new.

Why can't raw butter be used in the acne diet, considering that there is no protien in it? Or, what if you used butter oil? Is that allowed on the 100% strict diet? Would the normal butter not be allowed because the less than 1% protien it contains?
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RRM
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Re: Raw Butter

Postby RRM » Mon 11 Dec 2006 19:06

Fairy Prince wrote:Would the normal butter not be allowed because the less than 1% protien it contains?
Exactly.
Whats butter oil?
Fairy Prince
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Re: Raw Butter

Postby Fairy Prince » Mon 11 Dec 2006 20:11

Butter oil is the oil of butter. It is made by centrifuging butter to produce oil. Basically removing the little bit of proteins that are in butter. Its only downside is that it is CRAZY expensive. But it’s probably the best oil that you could put into your body.

http://www.drrons.com/x-factor-butter-oil.htm
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Re: Raw Butter

Postby RRM » Mon 11 Dec 2006 21:56

Fairy Prince wrote:it’s probably the best oil that you could put into your body
Why exactly is it better than other extra virgin oils in your opinion?
avalon
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Postby avalon » Sat 16 Dec 2006 20:02

Wow that IS expensive! I remember reading of it in Price's book. Hmmm how can we do that at home???

I've never thought to compare that with other oils. Looks like an interesting Google search is afoot.
Fairy Prince
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Re: Raw Butter

Postby Fairy Prince » Sun 17 Dec 2006 07:12

Why exactly is it better than other extra virgin oils in your opinion?
Well. I've heard that olive oil can throw your fatty acid profile of whack if eaten too much. Also, butter has the fat soluble vitamins A and D. Also, butter has good cholesterol that the olive oil doesn't have. It just seems that butter gives you more for its calories than olive oil does.
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Re: Raw Butter

Postby nick » Sun 17 Dec 2006 14:34

Fairy Prince wrote:
Why exactly is it better than other extra virgin oils in your opinion?
Well. I've heard that olive oil can throw your fatty acid profile of whack if eaten too much.
True, but that is why you need to eat raw fish like tuna salmon and some egg yolks which have the other fatty acids you need which keeps you in balance. By consuming too much olive oil and just yolks, you will notice some problems, but once you start eating some fish then you'll be fine.
Also, butter has the fat soluble vitamins A and D. Also, butter has good cholesterol that the olive oil doesn't have. It just seems that butter gives you more for its calories than olive oil does.
With this diet you'll get good cholesterol from the yolks and a little from the fish. Yolks contain A and D too which supplies enough them both.
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RRM
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Re: Raw Butter

Postby RRM » Tue 19 Dec 2006 20:22

Fairy Prince wrote:It just seems that butter gives you more for its calories than olive oil does.
The down side of butter is that the fat-soluble growth factors and hormones are also in the butter.
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Re: Raw Butter

Postby Fairy Prince » Wed 20 Dec 2006 02:46

The down side of butter is that the fat-soluble growth factors and hormones are also in the butter
I thought that the hormones in dairy were only in the protiens and butter is less than 1% protien. Is this not true?
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Postby RRM » Wed 20 Dec 2006 15:57

Most growth factors are indeed protein-like molecules and water-soluble, but not at all (just as is the case with vitamins).
Gerard
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cholesterol

Postby Gerard » Sun 14 Dec 2008 03:45

Isn't cholesterol itself a growth factor-- (promoting development and healthy growth) and that is part of the reason for the growth-promoting properties of full or partially-fat cows milk?
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Postby avo » Sun 14 Dec 2008 22:53

What are the differences, if any, between this 'butter oil' and standard ghee/clarified butter?
Gerard
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Butter oil vs ghee

Postby Gerard » Mon 15 Dec 2008 02:58

In many food labelling systems, butter oil (anhydrous) is considered to have effectively zero water content, while butter oil and ghee may have a bit more.

In Canada, for instance, the two are defined this way in their food inspection definitions:

Composition - Butter oil (anhydrous), Clarified butter; Ghee:

* shall be the product prepared from butter or cream and resulting from the removal of most of the water and solids non-fat content
* shall in the case of butter oil and ghee, contain not less than 99.3 % milk fat and not more than 0.5% water
* shall in the case of anhydrous butter oil, contain not less than 99.8% milk fat and not more than 0.1% water.

I've seen one or two other countries' labelling that is similar.

Ghee can be made at different temperatures from butter; sometimes the cholesterol may be partially oxidized. At least one brand of butter oil in the U.S. is centrifuged at relatively low temperatures, meaning it's not heat-damaged in its cholesterol profile. Mostly the definitions deal with water content, so you can have various different products with different oxidized cholesterol profiles going by different names, but it doesn't guarantee anything in terms of the damage to the cholesterol in it.
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RRM
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Re: cholesterol

Postby RRM » Mon 15 Dec 2008 19:01

Gerard wrote:Isn't cholesterol itself a growth factor-- (promoting development and healthy growth) and that is part of the reason for the growth-promoting properties of full or partially-fat cows milk?
Yes and no.
No, because it technically is not.
Well, yes indirectly, but then all essential nutrients are.
Let me xplain: 'growth factors' is not just 'positive factors regarding growth', its a label specifically given to factors that act like growth hormones, directly stimulating growth, but that are technically not hormones.
You can find some names of growth factors (and hormones) in milk on this page:
http://www.youngerthanyourage.com/13/cancer2.htm
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growth factor

Postby Gerard » Mon 15 Dec 2008 19:31

When I ate ghee as a munch/convenience food for cholesterol, it nearly always stimulated my appetite.

And it stimulated my appetite to eat more ghee, in fact.

So I have always wondered.


I do not eat any dairy products now at all, unless you count raw egg yolks. The effect of dairy on appetite kind of scared me.

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