Restricted calorie intake slows down aging

Fasting during the morning and (some part of) the afternoon, eating at night
Adam
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Calorie Restrictive Diet and aging

Post by Adam »

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/ ... 050806.php

Quote from the Article

"UF scientists found that feeding rats just 8 percent fewer calories a day and moderately increasing the animals' activity extended their average lifespan and significantly overturned the negative effects of cellular aging on liver function and overall health.

An 8 percent reduction is the equivalent of a few hundred calories in an average human diet and moderate exercise is equivalent to taking a short walk."
johndela1
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Re: In The News - Calorie Restrictive Diet w/ Exercise

Post by johndela1 »

There are other studies that go further by saying if you cut yoru calories by a percent you will live tha much longer or I should say age that much slower. My old boss ate about %50 of what he theortically needed. He believed he was aging half as fast. He looked like a skeleton. Roy Walford did a lot of work with this.

They call it CRON or some call it CRAN(Calory reduction optimum/adaquate nitrition) I think.

see this:
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&lr=& ... tnG=Search
nick
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Post by nick »

I believe with the Wai diet, you aren't overeating anymore, just the right amount your body needs plus or minus some. So compared to a normal diet where you overeat, that is where the concept of a calorie restriction diet comes into play. I don't think you would want to restrict calories on this diet as you would start losing wieght and other problems.

Think about it, compared to the Wai diet I remember eating more while on a normal cooked diet. With this diet, you eat just what you need.
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Post by johndela1 »

I dont' think that is the case according to the CRON researchers. You actually must be running less than what you need. There are manyreasons why, but it isn't about eating a normal diet that is over eating then cutting back so it is just what you need. It is actually eating less than you need.

There is a book by that explains it. I happen to have been exposed to this extensivly because I used to work with a guy that was friends with one of the main pioneers in this and is still activly envoved in the CRON community. He regularly has CRON meetings at his house with Laura Walferd who is the daugter of Roy.

There is one theory (about less radicals), that can be further read about here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calorie_re ... _glycation
there are some other theories of why it works here: http://www.answers.com/topic/calorie-restriction
johndela1
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Post by johndela1 »

This calorie restriction also works on the following:
yeast, rotifers, water fleas, nematodes, fruit flies, spiders, fish, hamsters, rats, mice, and dogs

I think some of these tests involved the proper diet. I guess I'm trying to say that this goes beyond a healthy diet and is specific to calorie reduction.
I dont' know if this is pushing it to say, but many people say that this is the only scientificly proven way to slow aging.
There have been no complete tests on humans, but they have proven without a doubt that they can cause animals to live to much longer on a calorie reduced diet.
Do you disagree with this? Keep in mind I'm not disagree about how it is done but if it is possible to extend a life of an animal lets say a rat for argument's sake.
As to the why, anything anyone says here would only a theory at best. There are many competing theories.
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Post by rischott »

I agree. In ancient Taoist texts for example, monks talked about eating only 1 nut a day and drinking only a few drops of water. The believed this intertwinded with meditation would result in immortality, or at least a long healthy life.
Are they really far off from something. Would say a 1000 calorie diet be harmful if all the right nutrients were involved? Wouldn't this slow our cellular activity down, in turn increases the life span?
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Post by johndela1 »

after doing some research, I have come to see some issues with saying cron will slow aging in humans

I do believe that it is a scientific (reproducale and oberservabe) fact that reducing caloires will make some forms of life live longer but I've also seen that it doesn't work on *all* life. for example it doesn't work on flies

also, it seems to work best when started early on in an animals life and some people believe that it doesn't carry over to larger mamals

so I currently dont' believe that it is scientificallyproven to slow aging in humans...

this link has some pros and cons:
http://www.answers.com/topic/calorie-restriction
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Post by johndela1 »

On the test animals, they fed them the same diet for both the regualr and reduced diet and saw that with the same diet (but with less) they lived longer

What I'm trying to say is if you got a group of rats and fed them their ideal diet (what ever that is) and you had two groups one with %50 of the calories as the other then the %50 groups would live longer. I do believe this is observable and reproduceable.

So (at least for rats) I dont' think the longer life is due to the healthier foods, because they use the same food for both groups and only chagne the quantity.
avalon
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Post by avalon »

And there's intermitent fasting!
However, recent research on eating only every other day, called "Intermittent Fasting", has shown beneficial effects that met or exceeded those of calorie restriction including reduced serum glucose and insulin levels.[4] One important aspect of intermittent fasting is that it does not require calorie restriction on the non-fasting days and does not cause stunted growth.
avalon
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Post by avalon »

How about this one that has to do with the amount of time in between meals.
Both the amount of calories over time and the frequency of meals affect the physiology of the brain in quite profound ways. The two dietary restrictive methods that include either the reduction of overall calories, such as due to undereating, or an increase in the time between meals (with no calorie restrictions) while keeping maintenance of dietary composition in terms of vitamins, minerals, protein, fat, etc., effectively improves brain performance, resistance to disease and overall aging.
avalon
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Post by avalon »

long-term calorie restriction is an effective intervention against the loss of muscle function with age
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/quer ... t=Abstract
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Post by johndela1 »

Most people who live a calory reduced life style report more energy. I used to work with a guy that was friends with the Walford's (one of the pioneers in CR). He did not lack energy.

he was skinny though

I dont' mean thin or slim,but skinny
rTP
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Restricted calorie intake slows down aging

Post by rTP »

It's been reasonably suggested several places on this site that the caloric management of Wai can reduce aging by reducing the frequency of cell cycles within your body and therefore allowing you to go longer before exhausting these cells' resources. Some very encouraging new research suggests that there may be more to this than simply stretching out your body's inevitable demise, and that a low-carb, low-calorie diet actually excites the production of a certain compound which reduces the effects of aging.

Cheers,
Reese
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Re: Wai and Aging

Post by dime »

Normally HDACs keep a pair of genes, called Foxo3a and Mt2, switched off. But increased levels of βOHB block the HDACs from doing so, which by default activates the two genes. Once activated, these genes kick-start a process that helps cells resist oxidative stress.
Something is fishy here. Why wouldn't those genes be activated all the time? If they help cells resist oxidative stress which is I guess beneficial for the body, it just doesn't make sense that they would be shutdown. Maybe there's some compromise related to their activation that isn't really apparent in that study on cells/tissue.
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RRM
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Re: Restricted calorie intake slows down aging

Post by RRM »

True, a restricted calorie intake increases beta-hydroxybuteric acid (βOHB) levels. (the Science abstract)
But a calorie-restricted diet does a whole lot of other things as well,
so to name βOHB (which also has toxic properties) as the key factor..., i dont know, a bit fishy indeed.
βOHB may indirectly activate Foxo3a and Mt2 to counteract oxidative stress,
but Foxo3a and Mt2 are just 2 of the many, many genes involved in counteracting oxidative stress.
Why would they be key over all the other ones?
In my view, its just a tiny part in a very complex process.
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